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Briefing Papers

Part of the remit of Age Action is to advocate Government and other bodies on behalf of older people. We have grown to become the leading advocacy organisation for older people - we are the “voice” of older people.

Our current Strategic Plan (pdf) identifies four key goals. Goal 1 is that through our advocacy work we will effect positive changes in legislation, policies and services that affect ageing and older people.

As part of that strategy we have committed to publishing a series of Briefing Papers on a range of subjects. Our first two Briefing Papers - respectively on the issues of mandatory retirement and the need for a convention on the rights of older people - were published in late 2016.  You can read or download these Briefing Papers in PDF format via the links below.

Briefing Paper on Reversing the 2012 State Pension Cuts (February 2017)

More than 36,000 pensioners had their pensions cut because of changes to the State Pension introduced in 2012. Many of these retired workers have lost thousands of euro and women pensioners have lost the most - punished for leaving the workforce to care for their families.

Briefing Paper on the Need for a Convention on the Rights of Older People (November 2016)

Age Action Briefing Paper on the Need for a Convention on the Rights of Older People (2016)

In Ireland today, in Europe and globally the rights of older persons are not effectively protected. International human rights law has little to say on issues particular to older people such as elder abuse or support in long-term care. Age Action is part of growing international support for a new international convention on the rights of older people that would address this.

Briefing Paper on Abolishing Mandatory Retirement (October 2016)

Age Action Briefing Paper on Mandatory Retirement in Ireland (2016)

Every year in Ireland older workers are forced out of their job for no other reason than they turn 65. This is possible because Irish law permits employers to impose mandatory retirement ages in their employee’s contracts, in effect, facilitating ageism and creating a set of second-class employment rights for older workers.

Latest revision date: 
02/12/2016